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The Sun-Times - Heber Springs, AR
Diana Boggia has a masters degree in education and writes about all kinds of parenting issues.
Remove to Remediate
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About this blog
By Diana Boggia
Diana Boggia has a masters degree in education with licensure in preschool, elementary and special education. She taught children with multiple disabilities for 15 years and has been working with parents (families) with behavioral concerns for more ...
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Your Perfect Child
Diana Boggia has a masters degree in education with licensure in preschool, elementary and special education. She taught children with multiple disabilities for 15 years and has been working with parents (families) with behavioral concerns for more than 23 years. She develops individualized strategies to build self esteem and diminish negative, attention-seeking behaviors for each child to be successful in achieving remarkable results. Throughout her work with parents Diana has developed a program that includes hands-on materials encompassing limit-setting, developing structure with schedules, teaching time management, increasing listening skills and parenting with incentives, rather than threats. These successful strategies have changed the dynamics of many families who were struggling with their child¹s behaviors.
Recent Posts
June 13, 2014 11:10 p.m.
May 11, 2014 11:10 a.m.
March 15, 2014 11:20 a.m.
Feb. 16, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Feb. 4, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Oct. 22, 2012 12:01 a.m.



Are you embarassed by your child’s meltdowns or all-out temper tantrums in public? Do you ignore rude behavior or give in to those ugly tantrums, because you know that enforcing the rules will escillate the situation? You are not alone. Many parents feel it is easier to quiet their child in that difficult moment by giving him whatever he wants. Unfortunately, giving in to your child teaches him that he can have whatever he wants when he puts on a big public display. Children learn through repetition and patterning, so each time you give in, you reinforce his tantrums. Children gain power when they learn that their parent won’t discipline or follow through in public. Very young children learn how to read parental responses and take control at an early age. Don’t feel defeated, and don’t feel pressured to give in. Learn simple techniques to improve any behavior in the heat of the moment. ”Remove to remediate”, and eliminate your child’s audience. Be confident and consistent as you parent through difficult times.  Watch the video Temper tantrums-TV Interview for a few quick tips at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgJJCT5wL8s&feature=plcp.

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